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Posts Tagged ‘when to asses lv function following stemi ?’

LV ejection fraction (EF) is the most commonly used  LV systolic functional index.Since , it is an  easily acquired parameter,  it’s popularity has zoomed among both learned and novice cardiology professionals .(Not withstanding the serious shortcomings!)

In one of the evening rounds  in my CCU , a young cardiology fellow told me about a  patient  with acute  anterior MI with ST elevation V1 to V5.

The patient  was lying supine with trunk up . HR was 110 . BP was  100 /70 There were few basal crackles .The patient was undergoing  lysis with streptokinase.

It was  suggested  to me by the  fellow  that  the patient is  going in for “Impending  cardiogenic shock since his EF is just 30%”

That prompted me to ask this question

How good is the EF  a measure  of size of MI during STEMI ?

EF during  STEMI  is highly variable parameter.The following are important con-founders in LV EF measurement during STEMI.

 

  • Acute ischemia induced LV dysfunction .(Ischemic stunning from  the watershed zone  significantly over estimate LV dysfunction)
  • Mitral regurgitation  if present will underestimate it
  • Effect of tachycardia and bradycardia can be significant
  • The posture of the patient and  measurement errors (A good Simpson score is rarely  possible in a sick patient )
  • Associated  hemo -dynamic drugs like NTG/Dopamine etc which alter  pre and after load   and changes the frank starling forces.

* Please recall  , LV EF is never included as a criteria to diagnose cardiogenic  shock, confirming the  flimsy  nature of this parameter during acute phase of STEMI !

Final message

The purpose of echocardiography during STEMI is to rapidly identify any mechanical complication , not to waste time in calculating EF.

EF is not a good indicator  to  quantify the extent of STEMI  or it’s prognosis. LVEF cannot be used  to risk stratify STEMI in the first  48 hours .One can expect  the true LV function  to prevail only  at discharge.

Ideally ,LV  function should be reevaluated by 2 weeks to get a fair idea of true myocardial function .By this time all  confounders will resolve.

Clinical implication

Since many of us are suffering from an academic obsession and blindly follow the scientific guidelines, a hurriedly diagnosed  “severe”  LV dysfunction post STEMI may land our  patients to  inappropriate intervention !

 

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