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Mohandas Karam Chand Gandhi ,  father of my country , India , made these observations in year 1925  about the  fundamental constituents of  violence in society . These words of monumental wisdom came when he was  addressing young Indians in a country- side rally .

mahatma gandhi quotes medical science humanity

Note, his finger points to , what  exactly is relevant to our profession ! He emphasized this  nearly  100 years ago, when medical science was at its infancy .One can only guess what would be Mahatma’s comment about our profession in it’s  current form !

Should we include moral, behavioral and ethical classes  right from the first year of medical  school along with Anatomy , physiology and bio chemistry.Medical council of India obviously need to burn more mid night oil , I wish it happens in my life time. !

Here is a  video recipe  !

Please click here to  see more videos from my you tube site

Prosthetic valve implantation has revolutionized the management of  valvular heart disease . The original concept valve  was a ball in a cage valve  , still considered as a  fascinating discovery.  It was conceived by the young Dr Starr and made by Engineer Edwards  .This was followed   by long hours of arguments,  debates and  experiments that ran into many months . The  silent corridors of  Oregon hospital Portland USA remain the only witness  to their hard work and motivation.  At last,  it happened , the first human valve was implanted in the year 1960. Since then . . . for nearly  50 years these valves  have done a seminal  job for the mankind.

With the advent of  disc valve and bi-leaflet valve in the  later decades of 20th century , we had to say a reluctant good-bye to this valve.

There is a  lingering question among many of the current generation cardiologists and surgeons why this valve became extinct ?

Starr and Edwards with their child !

We in India , are witnessing these old warrior inside the heart functioning for more than 30 years.From my institute of Madras medical college  which probably has inserted more Starr Edwards valve than any other  during the 1970s and 80s by Prof . Sadasivan , Solomon victor , and Vasudevan and others .

It is still a mystery why this valve lost its popularity and ultimately died a premature death.The modern hemodynamic  men  working from a theoretical labs thought  this valve was  hemodynamically  inferior. These Inferior valves worked  like a  power horse  inside the hearts  the poor Indian laborers  for over 30 years.

A Starr Edwards valve rocking inside the heart in mitral position

The cage which gives  a radial support* mimic  sub valvular apparatus, which none of the other valves can provide.

* Mitral  apparatus has 5 major  components. Annulus, leaflets, chordae, pap muscle, LV free wall.None of the artificial valves has all these components.  Though , we would love to have all of them technically it is simply not possible.  The metal cage of Starr Edwards  valve partially satisfies this  , as  it acts as a virtual sub valvular apparatus.Even though the cage has no contact with LV free wall, the mechano hydrolic  transduction of  LV forces to the annulus  is possible .

Further , the good hemodyanmics of this valve indicate , the cage ensures co axial blood  flow  across the mitral inflow throughout diastole. .Unlike the bi-leaflet valve ,  where the direction of  blood flow is determined by the quantum of leaflet excursion  in every beat . In bileaflet valves  each leaflet has independent determinants of valve  motion . In Starr Edwards valve the ball is the leaflet . In contrast to bi-leaflet valve , the contact area  of the  ball and the blood in Starr Edwards  is a smooth affair  and  ball makes sure  the LV forces are equally transmitted to it’s surface .

The superiority of bi-leaflet valves and disc valves  (Over ball and cage ) were  never proven convincingly in a randomized fashion . The other factor which pulled down this valve’s popularity was the supposedly high profile nature of this valve. LVOT tend to get narrowed in few undersized hearts.  This  can not be an  excuse , as no consistent  efforts were made to miniaturize this valve which is  distinctly possible.

Sudden deaths from  Starr Edwards valve  .

  • Almost unheard in our population.
  • The major reason  for the long durability of this valve is due to the  lack of  any metallic moving points .
  • Absence of hinge  in this  valve  confers  a huge mechanical  advantage with  no stress points.
  • A globe / or a ball  has  the universal hemodynamic advantage. This shape makes it difficult for thrombotic focus to stick and grow.

Final message

Science is considered as sacred as our religion Patients believe in us. We believe in science. A  good  durable valve  was  dumped from this world  for no good reason. If commerce is the  the main issue ( as many still believe it to be ! )  history will never  forgive those people who were  behind the murder of this innocent device.

Cardiologists and Cardio thoracic surgeons are equally culpable  for the pre- mature exit of this valve from human domain.  Why didn’t they protest ?  We  can get some solace  ,  if  only we can impress upon  the current valve manufacturers  to  give a fresh lease of life to this valve .

http://www.heartlungcirc.org/article/S1443-9506%2810%2900076-4/abstract

It is often said life is a cycle , time machine rolls without rest and reach  the same  point  again and again . This is  applicable for the  knowledge cycle as well .

We  live a life ,  which is infact a  “fraction of a time”(<100years) when we consider the evolution of life in our planet for over 4 million years.

Man has survived and succumbed to various natural and  self inflicted diseases &  disasters. Currently,  in this  brief phase of life  , CAD is the major epidemic , that confronts  modern  man.It determines the ultimate  life expectancy . The fact that ,  CAD is a new age  disease   and  it was  not  this rampant ,   in our ancestors  is well known .The disease has evolved with man’s pursuit for knowledge and wealth.

A simple example of how the management of CAD over 50 years will  help assess the importance of  “Time in medical therapeutics”

  • 1960s: Life style modification and Medical therapy  is  the standard of care in all stable chronic  CAD The fact is medical and lifestyle management remained the only choice in this period as   other options were not available. (Absence of choice was  a blessing as we subsequently realised  ! read further )
  • The medical  world started looking for options to manage CAD.
  • 1970s : CABG was  a major innovation for limiting angina .
  • 1980s: Plain balloon angioplasty a revolution in the management of CAD.
  • 1990s: Stent scaffolding of    the coronaries  was  a great add on .Stent  was too  dangerous  for routine use  was to be used only in bail out situations
  • Mid 1990s : Stents  reduced restenosis. Stents are  the greatest revolution for CAD management.Avoiding stent in a PCI  is unethical , stents  should be liberally used. Every PCI should be followed by stent.
  • Stents have potential complication so a good luminal dilatation with stent like result (SLR)  was  preferred so that we can avoid stent related complications.
  • 2000s: Simple  bare metal stents are not enough .It also has significant restenosis.
  • 2002: BMS are too notorius for restenosis and may be dangerous to use
  • 2004 : Drug eluting stents are god’s gift to mankind.It eliminates restenosis by 100% .
  • 2006:  Drug eluting stents not only eliminates restenosis it eliminates many patients suddenly by subacute stent thrombosis
  • 2007 : The drug is not  the culprit in DES it is the non bio erodable polymer that causes stent thrombosis. Polymer free DES  or   biodegradable stent , for temporary scaffolding  of the coronary artery  (Poly lactic acid )  are likely to  be the standard of care .
  • All stents  are  potentially dangerous for the simple reason any metal within the coronary artery  has a potential for acute occlusion.In chronic CAD it is not at all necessary to open the occluded coronary arteries , unless  CAD is severely symptomatic in spite of best  medical therapy.
  • 2007: Medical management is superior to PCI  in most of the situations in chronic CAD  .(COURAGE study ) .Avoid PCI whenever possible.
  • 2009 :The fundamental principle of CAD management  remain unaltered. Life style modification,  regular  exercise ,  risk factor reduction, optimal doses of anti anginal drug, statins and aspirin  is the time tested recipe for effective management of CAD .

So the CAD  therapeutic  journey  found  it’s  true  destination  ,  where it started in 1960s.

Final message

Every new option of therapy must be tested  against every past option .There are other reverse cycles  in cardiology  that includes the  role of diuretics  in SHT , beta blockers in CHF etc. It is ironical , we are in the era  of rediscovering common sense with sophisticated research methodology .What our ancestors know centuries ago , is perceived to be great scientific breakthroughs . It takes  a  pan continental , triple  blinded  randomised trial   to prove physical activity is good  for the heart .(INTERHEART , MONICA  studies etc) .

Medical profession is bound to experience hard times in the decades to come ,  unless we  look back in time and “constantly scrutinize”  the so called  scientific breakthroughs and  look  for genuine treasures for a great future !

Common sense protects more humans than modern science and  it comes free of cost  too . . .

NSTEMI  constitutes a  very heterogeneous population .The cardiac   risk   can vary  between very low to very high .  In contrast ,  STEMI patients  carry  a high risk for  electro mechanical complication including   sudden death .They all need immediate treatment  either with  thrombolysis or PCI to open up the blood vessel  and salvage the myocardium.

The above concept , may  be true in   many situations  ,  but what we fail to recognize   is  that ,   STEMI   also  is  a heterogeneous clinico pathological  with varying risks and outcome !

Let us see briefly ,  why this  is very important  in the management of STEMI

Management of STEMI  has undergone great  change  over the past 50 years and  it is the standing example of evidence based coronary care in the modern era ! The mortality  ,  in the early era was around 30-40% . The advent of coronary care units, defibrillators, reduced the mortality to around 10-15%  in 1960 /70s . Early use of heparin , aspirin   further improved the outcome .The inhospital mortality  was greatly  reduced to a level of  7-8% in the thrombolytic  era. And ,  then  came the interventional approach, namely primary PCI ,  which is now considered the best form of reperfusion when done early by an experienced team.

Inspite of this wealth of evidence   for the   superiority  of PCI  , it is only a fraction of  STEMI patients get  primary PCI   even in some  of the  well equipped centers ( Could be as low as  15 %)

Why ? this paradox

Primary PCI   has   struggled  to establish itself  as a global  therapeutic concept  for STEMI ,   even after   20 years of it’s introduction (PAMI trial)  .  If we  attribute ,  lack of   infrastructure  , expertise are  responsible for this low utility of primary PCI , we are mistaken ! There are so many institutions , at least in developing world ,   reluctant to do primary PCI  for varied reasons.( Affordability , support system , odd hours ,and finally perceived fear of untoward complication !)

Primary PCI may be a great treatment modality , but it comes with a inherent risk related to the procedure.

In fact the early hazard could exceed the potential benefit in many of the low risk STEMI  patients !

All STEMI’s are not  same , so all does not require same treatment !

Common sense and logic would   tell us any medical condition should be risk stratified before applying the management protocol. This will enable  us to avoid applying “high risk  – high benefit”  treatments in low risk patients . It is a great surprise,  the cardiology community has extensively researched to risk stratify NSTEMI/UA   ,  it has  rarely  considered risk stratification of STEMI before  starting the treatment.

In this context , it should  be emphasized  most of the clinical trails on   primary PCI  do not address  the clinical  relevance and the  differential outcomes   in various  subsets of  STEMI .

Consider the following two cases.

Two young men with STEMI  , both present within  3  hours   after  onset of symptoms

  1. ST elevation in V1 -V6 , 1 , AVL   ,  Low blood pressure , with severe  chest pain.
  2. ST elevation in 2 ,3, AVF , hemodynamically stable , with minimal  or no  discomfort .

In the above example,   a  small inferior  MI by a distal RCA occlusion  ,  and a proximal LAD lesion jeopardising entire anterior wall , both  are  categorized as STEMI !

Do you want to advocate same treatment  for both ?  or Will you  risk stratify the STEMI and treat individually ?  (As we do in NSTEMI !)

Current guidelines , would  suggest PCI for both situations. But , logistic ,  and real world experience would clearly favor thrombolysis for the second patient .

Does that mean,  the second patient is getting an inferior modality of treatment ?

Not at all . In fact there is a strong case for PCI being inferior in these patients as the risk of the procedure may far outweigh the benefit especially if it is done on a  random basis  by  not so well experienced cath lab team.

(Note : Streptokinase  or TPA does not  vary it’s action ,  whether given by  an ambulance drive or a staff nurse or even a  cardiologist !  .In contrast ,  the infrastructure and expertise have the  greatest impact on the success and failure  of PCI )

Final message

So , it is argued the world cardiology societies(ACC/ESC etc)  need to risk stratify STEMI (Like we do in NSTEMI ) into low risk, intermediate risk and high risk categories and advice primary PCI only for high risk patients.

 

Hippocrates is bestowed with the Immortal  tag “Father of Medicine”, not because he invented  any miraculous gene therapy or a modern virtual imaging of human organs, nor did he found any magic drugs .He didn’t receive a single award  even from his local village, forget about any Nobel prize to him !

hippocrates

Mind you , he lived before Christ ,2ooo years ago , there was nothing in the hands of noble professionals, not even a piece of paper and pencil to note down patient’s symptom .They didn’t even know what organs human body contained no basic medical tests . They just had a pair of hand, working brain with six senses , strong will to work hard and most importantly a caring mind and a constant search for answers to lingering scientific queries .

good medical practice hippocrates medical oath ethics drsvenkatesan dr s venkatesan

Yes, Hippocrates is still holding the post of father of medicine because he was the first human  to propagate  thought that human diseases are not evil forces beyond our control, it may have scientific basis , every disease has a specific cause that arise from derangement of body function.

More important than this , he formulated a way to practice this profession in a dignified manner. He also predicted common sense may prevail over science  in innumerable instances. Going through his quotes , one could wonder , he probably predicted technology might hijack human Intellect as well !

hippocrates quotesQuotation-Hippocrates-disease-Meetville-Quotes-149262Now,we have every thing. Students read medicine  in animated 3D class rooms , physicians  get a deluge of body system data &  images beamed straight into their ipad . One can perform  complex interventions with ease in almost every  organ or  even replace it , if it doesn’t work .

Still , as on 2017  ,there is something huge , that is missing  in the Noble profession when compared to ancient days  (2 millenniums before!) when people thronged Hippocrates  clinic in the remote Koss Island of Greece, where he used to sit  with almost  nothing , but was able to offer definite cure for many .

What is that missing link  ? Without realizing  what it is, we enter the Noble profession and fervently  take the  customary Hipocratic oath . For many (or most ?)  of us it is amusing to read and practice that. Life has moved in  fast lane since then. It is a tragic truth , Hippocratic oath  have become  redundant , obsolete .or outright humiliating for few !

Final message 

Whatever you say, still Iam compelled to feel sorry for that “Good old man” who miscalculated the Integrity modern day Noble professional , (I would say, Mr H failed to  realise doctors are also made from ordinary human beings ! )

It’s ok . . . here is a “Doctor’s life maintenance” manual : Keep reading it periodically !

British General medial council , has done a wonderful job . It has published a practical life maintenance and behavioral guide for  doctors  which I feel is most important text to be read periodically and of course  followed  !

Link to Good medical practice

 

A 50-year-old man was referred for dizziness, bradycardia and dysphagia .He was very clear in describing his symptoms and  landed up in Gastro- enterology  OPD , from there was referred to my clinic for cardiac work up . His ECG showed a sinus bradycardia HR of 48 /mt.

Screenshot_2017-07-05-19-09-12

Echocardiogram revealed a structurally normal heart as we expected , but was surprised to spot suspicious shadow in para-sternal long axis view , beneath left atrium.

A well demarcated large mass compressing left atrium.  Trans Thoracic Echocardiography  may not be looking at the heart alone ,(Its technically Thoracic Ultrasound though we may refer it as Echocardiogram   )

  • Aortic aneurysm ?
  • Mediastinal teratoma?
  • Bronchial adenoma ?
  • Esophageal mass ?

The Answer is none of the above

As I was wondering what it was, the staff nurse in charge threw a heavy folder with well worked up gastro Investigations.

That moment , diagnosis became obvious , without a need for further scrutiny to my medical acumen.

Note: The barium swallow of the Esophagus reveals the Intimate relationship between the food tube and the heart as it descends vertically downwards posteriorly  . Realise , how the proximity of these two structures could  confuse a physician when symptoms spill over on either way. (I would have expected a lateral view to show the compressive effect of Esophagus on the left atrium the radiologists felt its not important !)

Yes , it is Achalasia of the cardia , dilating the lower end of esophagus with fluid /mass effect  , compressing the posterior surface of Left atrium.He underwent a myomectomy surgery.

Why bradycardia  ?

There is well described esophago-vagal reflex reproducible by stressful swallow or balloon inflation in the lower end of esophagus at D7 level.(Ki Hoon Kang,Korean J Intern Med. 2005 Mar; 20(1): 68–71.)

Achalasia cardia is known to be associated with symptomatic bradycardia, dizziness, and rarely swallow syncope,though this patient didn’t have a classical syncope.The bradycardia is probably due to high vagotonia, (Hugging effect on posterior surface of heart known for rich innervation of vagus.) . Complete reversal  of bradycardia after esophago -gastric surgery is expected.

Implication for cardiologists

There has been instances of patients with esophageal syncope and reflex bradycardia getting permanent pacemaker therapy. I think , clinical or sub clinical esophageal disorders should be included in the work bradycardia before labelling them as intrinsic sinus node dysfunction .(Ref 1,4)

Final message 

The field of Cardiology  is often referred to as a super specialty atleast in India . I disagree with it strongly. Cardiologists are neither super(eme) nor special .We need to be reminded  its afterall a sub-specialty of Internal medicine and each specialist should undergo retro-training in medicine periodically .This patient is a typical example of a gastric problem entering the domain of cardiac Imaging.Strong foundations in symptom analysis and some degree of medical  curiosity will enable an occasional cardiologist to make a correct diagnosis belonging to a remote foreign specialty.

Reference 

1. Palmer ED. The abnormal upper gastrointestinal vagovagal reflexes that affect the heart. Am J Gastroenterol. 1976;66:513–522. [PubMed]

2.Armstrong PW, McMillan DG, Simon JB. Swallow syncope. Can Med Assoc J. 1985;132:1281–1284. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

3.Turan I, Ersoz GBor S..Swallow-induced syncope in a patient with achalasia
4.Dysphagia. 2005 Summer;20(3):238-40  4.Basker MR, Cooper DK. Oesophageal syncope. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2000;82:249–253.

Some of the noise bites from a busy cath lab after a  mid noon angioplasty

         Oh’  that  looks bad , whats that projecting !

There is some haziness too ,

            Make sure its not a flap,

  Better to do IVUS or should I OCT ?

           Shall I  post dilate with NCB ?

Should we cover with  another stent ?

           I think we can manage with Tirofiban or Reopro 

Call the chief ! suggested a first year resident,that seemed to be the most reasonable noise bite among all .Yes, the final command came from the chief cardiologist after a 10 second glance over the workstation ,”Guys,  forget it , . . its acceptable  pinching, DAPT will take care of it , just ensure adequate ACT till night , put the next case . . .on table” !

That’s fairly common chat session in any high volume cath centres (Which ended abruptly  in this case with the chief’s uttering)

Does any body know  what the chief meant by  the term pinching ?

  • Is it the  pinch of Intimal fold ?
  • Is it pinch of plaque ?
  • Is it a flap ?
  • Is it a plaque prolapse within the strut ?
  • Or just a evaginated thrombus
  • A subintimal calcium speck ?
  • A longitudinal stent deformation?

Any one knows the histology ? Is there any natural history  study of such pinching ?

Iam afraid no one knows . But common sense tell us it can be anything  between a totally benign entity to  Imminent nidus  for an acute stent thrombosis , depending upon the patient’s destiny and physician’s luck !

How does one make a decision in such an uncertain situation ?

The decision to leave that pinching is taken by any  cardiologist  based on his past experience or  Inexperience or both. Some do IVUS/OCT , many don’t . Whatever the decision  ( empirical or scientific ) its  going to be tentative  and  outcome is any body’s guess.

Final message

Coronary arterial pinching is a dangerous cath lab slang used exclusively by expert Interventional cardiologists , often after a hurried PCI ! It may sound  innocuous .To label a protruding plaque as a “safe pinch”demands heavy courage that is an essential requirement  for a successful Interventional  cardiologist , which most of them are blessed with !

Reference 

1.No Reference as such :There is no specific study about histology of coronary pinching  .Though , IVUS and OCT data are available for various post PCI shadows , it never addresses the issue of pinching specifically as no one is clear about what they mean by it.  Hence ,we are planning to decode this long pending mystery with our own  PINCH-iVUS  study.

2.This article from Circulation Imaging  new generation IVUS could reveal  histology of pinching

f5-large


Professional competence is defined as doing things, always in the Interest of patients. It’s generally believed small hospitals are not competent enough to treat cardiac emergencies . . .Do you agree with that ? No, Its largely a myth . Do you know there is a absolute  lack of proficiency  threatening to plague our country’s coronary care system. ? It’s the professional  Incompetence by the space age, star hospitals (mis)managed by masters of the noble business. None (am I right ?) of this hospitals either monitor or publish the outcome of their treatment.

Backed by pseudo scientific data , amplified by unrealistic expectations of ill Informed patients , some  hospitals are avoiding Initial emergency treatment of acute MI  , instead they waste time ( load DAPT ofcourse !) in securing the finance  for the costly Invasive procedures or refer them out of their premises if they can’t afford for it.In the ensuing emotional and financial melee many of the ill-fated patients lose vital  time window of thrombolysis as well ! and carry risk of fatality or damaged myocardium.

Every stake holder in the current  coronary care system simply assume the enforced modality  must be far superior because they administer the most modern and costly treatment suggested by few high intensity cared clinical trials originating from west. The wisemen who run the corporate hospitals  never realise medical competence and outcome is not entirely defined by science. Their primitive cognition wouldn’t allow to think beyond business equations either.

Please believe me, time and again, I have witnessed patients reaching Government hospitals  after being shunned away by  big (Some times even medium sized )  hospitals who boast themself only as PCI enabled care. Even if they want to lyse they stock only the Tenekteplace .

I think tragedy  is a lesser word to describe the scenario , where a distressed family is trying to arrange  for a Rs30,000 shot of Tenekteplace when thirty times cheaper still equally efficacious (Rs 1000 Streptokinase)  is concealed from their visibility .The Govt should urgently look into instances of large private hospitals avoiding Govt insurance scheme patients  even in  cardiac emergencies ! To label our poor patients as unaffordable ones is a outright misnomer, rather its the rich hospitals that are “not affordable” to lose profit and treat our countrymen , in a cost effective manner is the reality !

Who is Poor ? You decide.

Two forbidden things in coronary care

 1.Cajoling  and manoeuvring a distressed  family for a primary PCI as a routine treatment  hyping its beneficial effect and underplaying the true advantages of thrombolysis in largely technical jargons is the current norm in most coronary care units.

2.Another issue is , after confused confabulations with the duty medical officer,  if a rare patient family  choose the option of thrombolysis , comes the next googly*.  Many noble minded hospitals do not stock the low-cost and equally efficacious thrombolytic agent and offering  only the costly option to the anxious families when the myocardium is on fire.

Hospitals that  practice these two coronary protocols  need to be shamed and labeled as  “Coronary Incompetent  ” In spite of having 24/7 cath labs.  (Realise , they are just like  any remote rural hospitals , at least  the later can’t be faulted  as they don’t  withhold  a  reperfusion strategy  !)

Final message

I think , mindless proliferation of cath lab based cardiac care , which follow this theme , ie  “Thrombolysis incapable but PCI capable “ are  biggest threat to coronary care in our country ! For the best coronary care for any country ,what we need is efficient prehospital thrombolysis team .We have conveniently forgotten the great study of CAPTIM wherein the ambulance drivers replicated the same effect of primary PCI performed by highly trained cardiologists in modern labs.

In India,  primary health centers which is within  few km reach of entire population  can be designated as static ambulance equivalents  with basic resuscitation facility . If a multipurpose health worker can be trained to lyse, with remote supervision that will accomplish  90 % of what the cathlab guys can achieve ! Selective shifting is suffice.

Postample :  Ofcourse, not doing  pPCI for high risk or complicated STEMI is unscientific and we need to have proper consenting and referring frame-work for such patients.

Counter point : One of my colleagues asked me ? Why do I enjoy attacking the established scientific practices ?  May be I have a problem , yes, but  I think in a  true medical democracy we have right to debate anything , absolute truth is a ongoing journey !

 

 

*Googly:  An unplayable ball delivered to a batsman in the game of  cricket.

A 45 year old man came with  recent onset breathlessness.His left ventricle was dilated along with left atrial enlargement.The LV EF was 42% (By current definition mid range preserved systolic function( Circ Heart Fail. 2016 Apr;9(4))

But, he was severely symptomatic because of combined  systolic and  diastolic dysfunction.Diagnosing and grading diastolic dysfunction has been extensively done in last decade.Now , we realise without significant diastolic dysfunction symptoms of pulmonary congestion can never occur in patients with DCM.

We don’t require complex tissue Doppler parameters to diagnose high-grade LV diastolic function.Just have a look at LA dimension,  concentrate the E to A ratio. A tall E that humbles the A by more than 2 to 3 times is clear evidence for  LA mean Pressure exceed  18 to 20 mmhg or so.

This , in combination with dilated LA is a marker of chronic severe diastolic dysfunction.The fact that A is diminutive in no way takes the Importance of Atrial contribution to LV filing at this critically compromised LV status.

Note E:A ratio is 3:1 .This simply means the early (and mid to a certain extent ) diastolic pressure in LA is high and most of the filling takes place before Atrial contraction .There is one more reason for diminutive A . Atrial contractility fails to prevail over E in late diastole as LV end diastolic pressure is significantly high in these patients with diastolic dysfunction.

A dilated left atrium is an Independent marker of significant LV diastolic dysfunction (In the absence of MR) .When does LA begin to enlarge in diastolic dysfunction ? There is uniform rule.Generally LA size more than 4.5cm indicate grade 3 or 4 LV diastolic dysfunction.

LA size and Pulmonary congestion 

It’s a paradox , a roomy  LA dampens the LA pressure curve and A reversal into lungs may not happen.

*AF irony on A reversal

Logic might suggest , loss of atrial contraction might attenuate A reversal and less blood flooding into pulmonary veins.No, It doesn’t happen that way.If  AF is precipitated for any reason its going to be “switch on”  for acute pulmonary edema.

What is the relation between systolic and diastolic dysfunction in DCM ?

We find about 30 % of DCM has documented resting diastolic dysfunction.This is actually a underestimation of true diastolic dysfunction as it can very well manifest only during exertion.

Though generally , there is good correlation of grade of diastolic and systolic dysfunction in terms of severity , some of the patients show severe diastolic dysfunction out of proportion with systolic dysfunction.

Note : In the above patient it’s actually a fairly preserved systolic function but still has advanced diastolic dysfunction.

Grading of diastolic dysfunction .Image courtesy MM Redfield et al: JAMA 289:194, 2003. Note E:A >1.5 is

Final message

Relying on E:A ratio to diagnose diastolic dysfunction  may appear  amateurish for some of us .The rampant reporting of E>A for grade 1 diastolic dysfunction has made this parameter a “Doppler cliché”. But , the fact of the matter is,  it does help us confirm severe (Grade 4) diastolic dysfunction when E stands  tall and towering over an almost dwarfed A.

Clinical Implication

Please realise ,In patients with DCM  when you find an  A that is too diminutive in combination with  a menacingly tall E , it may be prudent to raise diuretic dosage. It’s a sure signal for impending pulmonary edema.

Queued queries 

Can DT and IVRT normalise with progressive diastolic dysfunction ?

Continue Reading »

Technology is a great equalizer.Never in my dreams, I would  have thought as I drive through the dense Nilgiris forest , a satellite  located 36000 Km up in the sky would guide  me through  every turn and bend most accurately.

The curvy roads are coded with  live traffic  flow in Red ,orange & green . That’s “Google map”  for you. (By the way, proud to note Google runs with an Indian CEO who hails from my city Chennai !)

Now , coming to academics , . .Some one thought,  if the traffic in the entire globe can be monitored with few clicks,  How about  adding live traffic data to the otherwise  dumb anatomical coronary angiogram images we get in a non Invasive  CT scan ?  We can even color code the different segments of coronary artery based on the velocity profile and pressure drop. That is CT- FFR . Now technology is  available to get online live FFR as well. (Siemens )

Live coronary traffic blood flow 

Fractional_Flow_Reserve_Coronary_CTA (1)

Heart flow the newest technology in coronary Imaging and  non invasive Quantitative assessment is possible .It provides direct information about how to navigate the coronaries and intervene only the reddish areas  leaving the greens untouched.

Principle

Its called computational fluid dynamics .A super computer calculates live FFR for the entire segment by measuring the drop in  CT density data in Hounsfield units and translates into pressure equivalents and hence non invasive FFR.This modality has been approved by FDA.The heart -flow and Siemens has come out with onsite CT FFR.

Reality check :Have we conquered the coronary physiology ?

Trying to  understand coronary flow with a engineering mind-set is Insulting the complexities of biology. Be reminded , Invasive FFR is assumed as a gold standard, Inspite of the fact that , its blessed with flaws in concept , techniques ,(Hyperemia vs no hyperimia) and lesional variation . Now ,what is the big deal , a non invasive CT -FFR  is compared Impure gold standard  and claiming a breakthrough ?

Of course,logic would suggest,if both FFRs are flawed why not use  a less invasive one that is CT -FFR. It can atleast save time, cost, and potential procedure related issues.May be ideal in ACS situations were catheter FFR can destabilise the patient.Further, it can provide  continuous live information in a hybrid lab , hence post procedure FFR is readily assessed . (Converting Red coronary into Green ones  would become cardiologists new moto!)

Final message

The point of contention for the modern day  cardiologist is ,they have realized (Not all ofcourse !) in a harsh way that , they must use a physiological confirmation of a lesion severity before indulging on fixing it with a metal. Whether CT-FFR will increase the number of angioplasties  or reduce will remain a mystery . Whatever it does , it should do it for appropriate reasons . We know any technology has a shelf life and If MRI can provide the MRI-FFR (Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance January 2014, 16:O55)  , CT will be pushed back for obvious reasons (Prohibitive radiation hazard)

Reference

Status of MRI based FFR 

Brugada syndrome is  as an  Inherited sodium Ion channel defect leading to loss of /or reduced sodium channel function.This specifically causes RV epicardial Imbalance of In-flowing(depolarising)  and out-flowing (repolarising)current , potentially triggering ventricular arrhythmia. This happens either spontaneously or during electrical stress times which include, fever, various drugs , adverse autonomic fluxes etc. So far,  we have been thinking it as primary electrical disorder with no macroscopic/ histopathologic  defects.

Newer Insights are emerging

But, how is this primary electrical disease , harbor a well demarcated  RV epicardial phenotypic substrate ? .  . . ablation of which eliminates the VT.

Zone of probable structural defect over RV epicardium (Pink zone) amplified by infusion of Ajmaline. Note the ECG showing typical ST elvation lead V1 to V3 .(Image courtesy Carlo Pappone et all  )

A recent study from Italy from the original founders  (Brugada team Ref 1 ) has confirmed RF ablation of RV epicardial tissue  is indeed feasible in many and should be considered in high risk Brugada syndrome. (Then should we suggest , ICD is no longer a choice in Brugada ?)

MRI findings in Brugada has shown some structural defects .(Ref 3,5) .It seems  Brugada is an Inherited electrical cardiomyopathy with a structural defect. (The overlap between ARVD and Brugada syndrome appear more real than we thought before ! (Ref 7 )

Final message

Still , Brugada is more of a electrical disorder,  but soon we may refer it as structural heart disease.

Reference

4.Catalano O,Antonaci S,Moro G,Magnetic resonance investigations in Brugada syndrome reveal unexpectedly high rate of structural abnormalities. Eur Heart J. 2009;30:22412248Abstract/FREE Full Text/Google Scholar
A best review comparing Brugada vs ARVC