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Posts Tagged ‘abdominal angina’

Dr Shirely Smith  from charring cross hospital London  wrote this masterpiece  in BMJ in the year 1962 . He was doing a research about the origin of angina like pain in patients who had  upper GI disease or disorders of cervical spine .He found a hidden invisible neural link between heart and it’s neighboring viscera. What he  referred it as linked angina . It links the  pain from ,Esophagus,  gall bladder ,  duodenum ,  cervical spine to the  heart .

This article I  consider as one of the  all time classics in  clinical cardiology . Here is the link for linked angina (Courtesy of BMJ)

linked angina atypical angina abdominal angina  shirley smith cornelio papp 2 bmj

linked angina atypical angina abdominal angina  shirley smith cornelio papp bmj

High lights ( Inferred )  from the  article

We know angina typically occurs on exertion .If it occurs at rest we call it as unstable angina .

Can it occur at rest other than unstable angina ?

Yes it can . ( Post prandial ,Nocturnal, emotional etc)

Can the  heart be the referral site for visceral pain ?

Yes .It seems so .

Can visceral pain be trigger for  developing true angina ?

Again possible . A Patient with documented CAD  develop  a true esophageal pain it is likely  to  induce a sensation of  angina  rather than abdominal pain .Similarly , cervical pain may represent a masked angina in a patient  with active cervical spondylitis .(Homing in of angina to the nearest non cardiac culprit )

 

Final message

Those were the times when the brain worked more than hands . Common sense prevailed over machine sense .This article argues for a  big debate about the origin of so called atypical angina in a patient with multiple common visceral conditions.Even 50 years later we have little clue  about alimentary -cardiac neural spill over !

Reference

http://www.bmj.com/highwire/filestream/276395/field_highwire_article_pdf/0/1425

Postamble

Today we live in a complex and confusing and commercial  medical world .We have atleast  a dozen chest  pain triaging protocols in ER . Still errors are  rampant. Errors are acceptable . . . but this one was an absolute  shocker  . . .  “I know a  patient with vague chest/epigastric  pain  , non specific T inversion ,  documented gall stones , landed in cath lab not by accident but  by meticulous planning !”

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